Abhay Shivgounda Patil

About what matters.

Archive for the ‘Religion’ Category

My blogs – So far!

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[Updated on October 11, 2016.]

My recent “professional” blogs on LinkedIn here:
Demystifying Continuous Performance Management
Life Lessons from Originals – a wonderful book by Adam Grant
Interviewing for Hiring: Nobel Laureate’s Advice
Leadership Learning
Self-healing Systems

A few personal blogs on education, society and stuff.
If you don’t see beauty, you are not seeing
Notes from a talk by K B Jinan, the activist, designer and disruptive educationist.
Geshe Dorji Damdul on Mindfulness:
HH Dalai Lama’s confidante’s take on mindfulness.
Remembering Dijkstra
My talk on some of the quotes by the eminent computer scientist Edsgar Dijkstra.
Turning Around Universities
My notes of a talk by Prof. Deepak Phatak on how MOOC can dramatically change the role of a traditional University.
Gen Y For Dummies
Had a good time attending the NASSCOM (Pune) session on Gen Y management.
The Loss of Innocence – The IIT, Then and Now
A typical IIT student was intelligent, unassuming, self made, studious and rooted well in the “local” ethos.
Mathematics for justice!
Can we divide something between people such that everyone is guaranteed to be satisfied?
Let’s Talk Dirty!
That’s right. I do want to talk about things dirty.
Watch Thyself!
What do I do when I see an accident?
Wages of Inequality – P. Sainath’s lecture in Pune
Will we ever stop wearing our ideologies on our sleeves and instead focus on the human side of the story?
Can we ever read History with an open mind?
As an 11 year old in the 9th grade, untouched by any “ism” and totally oblivious of the label p-secular …

And here are some personal musings!
Some Poetry recital (काव्यवाचन) on Soundcloud!
Sharad Joshi Interview
“I see a lot of parallels between the socialism of the first Prime Minister Nehru and the so-called development-politics of PM Narendra Modi.” Always insightful to know what this iconic leader has to say on the issues that confront us. (Translated from original Marathi.)
Uniqueness of Religious Regions of Maharashtra
Religious Geography of Maharashtra – now that’s one scary academic sounding topic!
Tale of Two Relocations
My experience of two relocations – first in the year 1993 to the USA and then in 2001 to India.
दोन स्थलांतरांची गोष्ट
“तुम्ही भारतात परत का आलात?”
बोलाचे साहित्य बोलाचेच विश्व, रंकाचे धन आणि रावांचे कवित्व ॥
विश्व मराठी साहित्य संमेलन!
आता तुम्हीच काळजी घ्यायला हवी…
A poem by Shankar Vaidya.
One year of JM – FC road one way plan
Serious issues needing urgent corrective measures. (August 20, 2010)
Was ist Mitaan bitte?

Written by Abhay Shivgounda Patil

February 22, 2015 at 7:32 pm

Uniqueness of Religious Regions of Maharashtra

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(Picture: downtoearth.org.in/)

(Picture: downtoearth.org.in/)

Religious Geography of Maharashtra – now that’s one scary academic sounding topic! But after I skimmed through a delightful note by Prof Anne Feldhaus, I decided to attend the talk and boy was it wonderful!  Here are my notes.  Disclaimer: I have paraphrased what I heard and I am no academician myself. 

As Prof. Suhas Palshikar spoke in Marathi about late Prof. Rajendra Vora, in whose memory the talk was organized, the sari clad elderly Caucasian American lady with snow white hair was seen nodding appreciatively.  A small disappointment then when Prof. Palshikar announced that Ms. Feldhaus would be speaking in English.

Ms. Feldhaus talked about six patterns that have created regions bound by common threads  of faith.  These patterns were stories, body images, goddess sisters, numbered sets, biography of saints and pilgrimage.

She narrated the story of the birth of river Karha.  Arjun and Nakula in search of water, toppled the kamandalu of a sage and thus was born the river Karha.  They  ran for their life with the sage in hot pursuit.  Whenever the sage would get close, they would throw a rice grain behind them.  The grain would turn in to a shiva-linga and the sage would stop in his tracks to worship it!  That explains the Shiva temples along the bank of Karha.  The villages around Karha, in a sense, signify a region defined by this story.

The Purush Sukta in Rigved uses the metaphor of human body to describe rivers.  Interestingly, eight locations of the river Godavari have been likened to eight angas – body parts – of a woman; from head to toe.

Then she talked about seven goddesses, the Malai sisters, who once in a year visit their maher, i.e. home of their parents, from seven different locations.  This religious event binds the eight locations.

Then there are these numbered locations – the ashta-vinayak, the 11 Maruti, the three and a half shakti-peeths and so on.  These sets too define a region.

The holy places of he Mahanubhav panth are all about the activities of their founder, Chakradhar Swami, and his guru.  The place where he slept, where he delivered his message – even where he went to the bathroom – are enshrined as holy places!

And the last, and the most significant, pattern that creates religious regions is the pilgrimage.  The wari of Pandharpur being the most significant example.

At this point, she came up with two key observations.

Some of the regions overlap geographically, but, interestingly, they don’t meet!  She cited Jejuri as an example.  It happens to be near Karha, the annual palakhi of Janai originates from there, the Morgao of ashta-vinayak is not too far, one of the Malai sisters belongs to this place and the Pandharpur pilgrimage passes through Jejuri.  However, folks who are passionately involved in one of the regions are often found to be completely oblivious to the other regions which exist there!

Her second observations was that, with one notable exception, none of these religious regions has metamorphosed into any administrative or political entity.  The glorious exception being the wari of Pandharpur which united the Marathi speaking folks not withstanding the cast and class differences.  She credited the wari with the creation of the state of Maharashtra.

Personally, it was a very different perspective for me, coming from  an American scholar  who has almost adopted Marathi as her language.  To know more about Anne, do read this immensely entertaining note she wrote for her colleagues at the Arizona State University.

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Written by Abhay Shivgounda Patil

February 24, 2014 at 10:47 pm